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20121205
20121213
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26 days away from the fiscal cliff. steve liesman joins us now live from the treasury. he has an exclusive interview with one of the key negotiators at the white house, secretary of treasury timothy geithner. >> maria, thank you. i'm here with the secretary of treasury at a crucial time. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> speaker boehner has put forward a proposal which "usa today" says demonstrates more political courage the democrats have shown. the white house is saying today it's not even wor ty -- worthy of a response. what are we missing? >> i think we are making progress. they acknowledged they were prepapered to do $800 billion in higher taxes on part of the american economy. that's part of the balanced framework. that's definitely progress. what we need to see is have them acknowledge the rates go up. if they're willing to accept that and commit to that, then we think we could do something good for the economy. we can make the government use the taxpayers' money more efficiently, lock in some spending savings and do some long-term entitlement reforms to make s
the impact. >> lower bang for your qe buck as steve liesman put it earlier on. >> thanks for joining us. always good to see you, eyore pento. >> putting fire into the conversation. >> thank you. >>> so much for the holiday cheer. with the rate things are going in washington, there will be plenty of holiday jeer between now and the new year. >> the president's called for $1.4 trillion worth of revenue. that cannot pass the house or the senate. >>> well, two former presidential candidates face off after the break. i feel like i'm going back to 2008 or 2004. steve forbes says no tax hikes for anybody while howard dean argues everybody needs to pay a little more in taxes and not just the upper income. both sides of that coming up here. >> and also just ahead, the ceo of a tech company says he may be forced to cut jobs because of washington's fiscal follies. he's going to be here. he's going to explain how bad it will be, not just for him, but for other companies as well. >> and then later a retail boom on main street and wall street. with just two weeks to go until christmas, we'll tell you
. steve liesman up next with surprising new results from the exclusive cnbc survey. >>> and then as the lawsuits fly over hewlett-packard's autonomy mess, i'll talk with the ceo of deloitte and their role in looking over the books. ally bank. why they have a raise your rate cd. tonight our guest, thomas sargent. nobel laureate in economics, and one of the most cited economists in the world. professor sargent, can you tell me what cd rates will be in two years? no. if he can't, no one can. that's why ally has a raise your rate cd. ally bank. your money needs an ally. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 this morning, i'm going to trade in hong kong. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in total control because i can trade tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 directly online in 12 markets in their local currencies. t
a redistribution of sales simply because they don't have the inventory at box stores. >> i hear what steve just said. but given the jobs report, we've also seen a drop in gasoline prices. when you get the -- when you remember the prices fell by gasoline. your decline in prices. that's a big increase in consumer spending and probably income last month. so i think consumers can replenish savings just a little bit and still have spending. you also have at the upper end $20 billion and growing of dividends declared this month. to beat the tax hike. that's $20 billion of cash flow that higher income individuals, not all of them but many of them will get. and much of that will end up being spent. >> you acknowledge that university in michigan consumer sentiment, that was big decline. and much of that is attributable to fears about the fiscal cliff. all bets could be off the table if we go off the fiscal cliff. >> sure if you go over the cliff. and you'll still have some tax hikes. we have consumer spending around 2% in real terms in line with income. we don't think the whole tax hikes will go into ef
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4